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Here's why CNN isn't 'doxing' anyone

Here's why CNN isn't 'doxing' anyone
From Engadget - July 7, 2017

And that was just the intro. However, Kluwe was not doxed minutes or even weeks later. Kluwe hit Twitter the following day to drive home the fact that attackers were clearly targeting women, something Gamergate proponents have long denied: "And for the record, none of youf**king #Gamergate tools tried to dox me, even after I tore you a new one. I am not even a tough target."

Kluwe discovered plans to dox him on a public message board about a month later, though it's unclear whether the attackers were tied to Gamergate at all.

Gender not only dictates likely victims of a doxing attack; it also plays a role in how individuals view privacy threats. Women are more often the target of sexual harassment and stalking attempts online, and are therefore inundated with warnings about keeping accounts, photos and all personal information exceptionally private. Men face privacy threats and are reminded to keep their digital lives on lock, but they are generally spared the relentless, buzzing anxiety that comes with being a woman online.

Violet Blue offers a real-world example of this perspective gap in her book The Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy: A man and a woman, a couple, hear Snapchat has been hacked, and users' real names and phone numbers are out in the wild. The man brushes it off, saying it's just his name and number, no big deal. The woman, however, is immediately concerned. She sees a real, increased risk of stalking or harassment.

"It is not a story about 'right' or 'wrong' ways of thinking about privacy," Blue writes. "Their reactions just show a great example of the difference between what women and men see as risky exposure. He did not think it was a big deal for anyone to have his number, username, and real name. She, on the other hand, said it made her worried."

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