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It's unlikely that the TRAPPIST-1 planets support life

From Engadget - July 13, 2017

Two separate teams at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics say the behavior of the star makes it less likely than we'd thought (or hoped) that the system could harbor life. The star in question, TRAPPIST-1, is a red dwarf that is much fainter and cooler than the Sun. Therefore, to be in the habitable zone, planets must be much closer to the star than the Earth is to our sun.

The news is grim: The UV radiation the habitable zone planets experience is much greater than Earth's. "Because of the onslaught by the star's radiation, our results suggest the atmosphere on planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system would largely be destroyed," says Avi Loeb, coauthor of a paper published in the International Journal of Astrobiology. The team estimates that the likelihood that life could exist on TRAPPIST-1's habitable zone planets is just 1 percent, as compared to the likelihood for life existing on Earth.

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