Advertisement

Apple iPhone X hands-on: 10 years in, Apple rewrites its rulebook

Apple iPhone X hands-on: 10 years in, Apple rewrites its rulebook
From Engadget - September 12, 2017

So, let's dive right in. Tim Cook was very adamant that this meticulously crafted machine represented the future of the smartphone, and he was probably right. After all, Apple's sheer popularity means that whatever it sticks into its devices is what the rest of the industry has to respond to. You are right to think the iPhone X seems a little familiar, though. Its 5.8-inch, edge-to-edge OLED display is indeed beautiful, especially up close. I originally expected the notch to bother me more at first since it's noticeably larger than the one on Essential's PH-1. Well, I was wrong. Apple has historically kept iOS's top bar pretty clean, s it does not really matter that there's a huge chunk cut out of it.

What did bother me a little more than expected were the bezels that run around the screen. To be absolutely clear: they are really not that big, and I expect most people thinking about dropping $1,000 on a phone could not care less. Still, given that Apple's competition has done an incredible job trimming the cruft from around their displays, I ca not help but feel that the iPhone X's design does not have the same kind of impact as, say, the Essential or Samsung's recent Galaxys. Of course, your mileage may vary. I definitely ca not complain about build quality, though: the X's glass front and back melt effortlessly into the stainless steel ring that runs around the phone, and the precision on display here is nothing short of fantastic.

So yeah, Apple built a beautiful phone. What else is new? What's really important is the way Apple rejiggered iOS to work without a home button -- if that sucked, the $1,000 asking price would be even more unreasonable. Thankfully, the team working on iOS cooked up a pretty elegant solution. If you have used a new iPad Pro, you sort of know what I am talking about -- now, you swipe up from the bottom of the screen to view all your running apps in card form, and getting back to the home screen involves dragging the app window down and flicking it away. After years of mashing the home button, using the iPhone X was... very strange for the first few minutes. Once everything clicked, I was shocked that Apple had not tried to do this sooner. It feels incredibly natural, to the point where after a few minutes of playtime, I really do not want to go back to the 7 Plus.

Goodbye, home button. I am not going to miss you.

Advertisement

Continue reading at Engadget »