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How Microsoft embraced 'messy' creativity with Windows Ink

How Microsoft embraced 'messy' creativity with Windows Ink
From Engadget - October 21, 2017

In particular, Woodman credits Microsoft's close partnership with Wacom, a company best known for its stylus tablets and displays, for the progress with Windows Ink so far. That allowed the two companies to build a sensor that "essentially allows you to go between pen protocols." For computer makers, that's helpful since it lets them choose between different pen protocols. Basically, it let Microsoft open up the market for styluses, just like Windows did for PCs decades ago.

Now, Woodman says retailers are selling twice as many pen-capable machines, compared to those that do not have them. 43 percent of consumers with stylus machines are also using their pens monthly, according to Microsoft's stats. Given just how well they are taking off, though, it's surprising that Microsoft chose to make the Surface Pen an additional $100 purchase for the Surface Laptop, Pro and upcoming Book 2.

Windows Ink's integration with Microsoft Office is a clear example of how stylus support can breathe new life into programs we have used for years. In Word and PowerPoint, you can use a stylus to edit documents as if you were marking up paper. And, as you can imagine, having a more natural input mechanism is a big help for OneNote. It's not only useful for jotting down your thoughts, but you can also use it for recording complex math equationsthe sort of thing that would be tough to type out on a keyboard. OneNote can also convert your handwritten equation into something formatted for a computer, and you can then have it evaluate an equation, factor it and graph it.

It was a long road getting here, though. The first "Tablet PCs" powered by Windows XP (like the Compaq on the right) were woefully underpowered, heavy and generally just hard to use. It was difficult enough to get them to do basic Windows tasks, so there was not much chance consumers would spend time with their styluses. There were also some early digital pens available for Windows 8. Really, though, it took the launch of the Surface 2 and Pro 2 for us to really see what a stylus could do in Windows. The Surface Pen was light, responsive and simply felt good to use. Microsoft steadily refined it with future Surface models, giving us better tips and more pressure sensitivity.

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