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This is what a 50-qubit quantum computer looks like

This is what a 50-qubit quantum computer looks like
From Engadget - January 9, 2018

That's where the pumps would normally come in. From top to bottom, the system gradually cools from four Kelvin -- liquid-helium temperatures -- to 800 milliKelvin, 100 milliKelvin and, finally, 10 milliKelvin. Inside the canister, that's 10 millionths of a degree absolute zero. The wires, meanwhile, carry RF-frequency signals down to the chip. These are then mapped onto the qubits, executing whatever program the research team wishes to run. The wiring is also designed in a way to ensure that no extraneous noise -- including heat -- is transported to the quantum computer chip at the bottom.

Many in the industry have suggested that a 50-qubit system could achieve "quantum supremacy." The term refers to the moment when a quantum computer is able to outperform a traditional system or accomplish a task otherwise thought impossible. The problem, though, is that quantum computers are only compatible with certain algorithms. They are well-suited to quantum chemistry, for instance, and material simulations. But it's unlikely you will ever use a quantum computer to complete a PowerPoint presentation. "The world is not classical, it's quantum, so if you want to simulate it you need a quantum computer," Welser said.

Researchers have already conducted experiments with quantum computers. Scientists at IBM were able to simulate beryllium hydride (BeH2) on a seven-qubit quantum processor last September, for example. But critics want to see a quantum computer accomplish something more tangible, which is more meaningful for the everyday consumer. That day, unfortunately, could still be a long way off.

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