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US Senate and Navy computers tied to revenge porn site

From Engadget - January 11, 2018

Some of the messages originating from Senate IP addresses asked for nude photos, or "wins," of specific women while others included so-called "Xray" posts -- photos edited so the women in them appear to be nude or dressed in more revealing clothing. A post linked to the Executive Office of the President shared an image of a naked woman and claimed to have more that would be shared once others posted photos. Users connected to Navy IP addresses asked for photos of specific women -- including servicewomen -- and shared nude photos while teasing more.

The Daily Beast notes that having the IP addresses of Anon-IB users does not allow specific people to be linked to the site. And it's also possible that hackers could be routing traffic through the government computers. A Navy official told The Daily Beast, "The Navy holds all our employees -- military and civilian -- to the highest standards of personal conduct, expecting everyone to treat each other with dignity and respect. Those who conduct themselves contrary to our core values of honor, courage and commitment will be held accountable."

Fighting revenge porn has proved to be tough and the anonymity of sites like Anon-IB does not help. Twitter, Microsoft, Google and Pornhub have issued new rules or made reporting revenge porn easier in recent years while Facebook, which has struggled to fix its major revenge porn problem, released a prevention tool last year that requires users to upload their own nude photos -- a feature that was, naturally, met with skepticism.

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